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Q&A: Is the Akai mpc5000 a better look than the 2500? The Akai mpc5000 just hit the market,…?

Question by guenndu: Is the Akai mpc5000 a better look than the 2500? The Akai mpc5000 just hit the market,…?
…what’s good with it?
Many of us old heads are loyal to the 1000, and 2500 akai. However, I am hearing alot of noise about the mpc5000. Most people know Akai reigns supreme in the industry for the best production sounds and compilations. From what I know the Akai mpc5000 is just making it’s way to the public.

Best answer:

Answer by laburnic
Akai has announced 2.0 OS for their flagship MPC5000 drum machine workstation, a free download for MPC owners. Now, the MPC itself has long been a bit minimalist in what it does – I think that’s part of its appeal, that it has resisted complexity. But users of the MPC1000 and 2000/2500 have as a result turned in some cases to an alternative firmware, JJOS, to get all the features they want. And Akai has generously looked the other way.

Akai says the 2.0 OS responds to user requests. Here’s what’s baked in:

Keygroup programs for chromatic, key-mapped samples (that wasn’t in there before, really?)
S1000/3000/4000/5000/6000, Z4/Z8 import
Effects automation recording, “an MPC first” (by which I assume they mean it’s the first time on the MPC, as this is commonplace in software, certainly)
Controller Grid Edit Window for graphical controller automation / event editing (something Roland has touted in the past on their machines)
“Chopshop” for slicing samples into smaller pieces, with a Zoom feature
MultiEdit: edit multiple pads at once
Quantize Track Mutes (something Ableton users, incidentally, have asked for but not gotten, although implementation on a computer is a different can of worms because of plug-ins)
Generally, it looks good to me – not anything that’s so impressive for those of us committed to computer workflows, but looks nice if you’re a 5000 owner. But as a non-MPC person, I’m not terribly qualified to respond. So I leave that to our MPC-using crowd. Let us know what you think, and whether you folks with devices like the MPC1000 and MPC2500 with the JJOS running are jealous – or don’t care.

What do you think? Answer below!

2019-04-12T12:41:35+00:00 Akai MPC 2500|4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Dulcibella at - Reply

    Akai has announced 2.0 OS for their flagship MPC5000 drum machine workstation, a free download for MPC owners. Now, the MPC itself has long been a bit minimalist in what it does – I think that’s part of its appeal, that it has resisted complexity. But users of the MPC1000 and 2000/2500 have as a result turned in some cases to an alternative firmware, JJOS, to get all the features they want. And Akai has generously looked the other way.

    Akai says the 2.0 OS responds to user requests. Here’s what’s baked in:

    * Keygroup programs for chromatic, key-mapped samples (that wasn’t in there before, really?)
    * S1000/3000/4000/5000/6000, Z4/Z8 import
    * Effects automation recording, “an MPC first” (by which I assume they mean it’s the first time on the MPC, as this is commonplace in software, certainly)
    * Controller Grid Edit Window for graphical controller automation / event editing (something Roland has touted in the past on their machines)
    * “Chopshop” for slicing samples into smaller pieces, with a Zoom feature
    * MultiEdit: edit multiple pads at once
    * Quantize Track Mutes (something Ableton users, incidentally, have asked for but not gotten, although implementation on a computer is a different can of worms because of plug-ins)

    Generally, it looks good

  2. conacre at - Reply

    Like any time a new MPC drops, there’s a lot of hype surrounding the Akai’s new MPC5000. Though to keep it all the way real, it’s nowhere near the type of frenzy that producers were in when the original MPC 4000 hit the market. That said, I haven’t had the chance to get my hands on one (thanks Akai), and after reading Just Blaze’s review, geez I think I better wait till the fix the thing before I do so.

    Taken directly from Just Blaze’s blog . Warning: THIS POST IS KINDA LONG.

    … Akai, you have 100% let me down for the first time with the MPC-5000. I really didn’t even expect much, once I realized that it was based on the 2500/1000 architecture and not the 4000 series. I looked at it more like hey, I need something for the house, it’s got a smaller footprint than the 4 (which I have no room for), and it’s got a synth in it. I guess it can’t be all that bad.

    Now I know, whenever you are an early adopter, you are the beta tester, and the rest of the folks will go out and wait for version 2 or something.. I can deal with that. I’m a beta tester by nature. I love playing with things before they become commercially available.

  3. swami at - Reply

    Akai has announced 2.0 OS for their flagship MPC5000 drum machine workstation, a free download for MPC owners. Now, the MPC itself has long been a bit minimalist in what it does – I think that’s part of its appeal, that it has resisted complexity. But users of the MPC1000 and 2000/2500 have as a result turned in some cases to an alternative firmware, JJOS, to get all the features they want. And Akai has generously looked the other way.

    Akai says the 2.0 OS responds to user requests. Here’s what’s baked in:

    Keygroup programs for chromatic, key-mapped samples (that wasn’t in there before, really?)
    S1000/3000/4000/5000/6000, Z4/Z8 import
    Effects automation recording, “an MPC first” (by which I assume they mean it’s the first time on the MPC, as this is commonplace in software, certainly)
    Controller Grid Edit Window for graphical controller automation / event editing (something Roland has touted in the past on their machines)
    “Chopshop” for slicing samples into smaller pieces, with a Zoom feature
    MultiEdit: edit multiple pads at once
    Quantize Track Mutes (something Ableton users, incidentally, have asked for but not gotten, although implementation on a computer is a different can of worms because of plug-ins)
    Generally, it looks good to me – not anything that’s so impressive for those of us committed to computer workflows, but looks nice if you’re a 5000 owner. But as a non-MPC person, I’m not terribly qualified to respond. So I leave that to our MPC-using crowd. Let us know what you think, and whether you folks with devices like the MPC1000 and MPC2500 with the JJOS running are jealous – or don’t care.

    Free download / more specifics:
    http://www.akaipro.com/MPC5000

  4. vindictive at - Reply

    OVERVIEW
    The Akai MPC 2500 is a completely redesigned MPC that bridges the gap between the high-end MPC 4000 and the industry standard MPC 2000, while adding several new, unique features. At its foundation, the MPC 2500 retains all the features that make the MPC series so popular: 64 track MIDI sequencing, 32-voice/ 16 bit digital sampler, easy editing, and those 16 velocity and pressure sensitive pads, the signature of the MPC series.

    USES
    – recording + sampling
    – audio + MIDI sequencing
    – audio manipulation
    – drum programming

    KEY UPGRADES FROM THE MPC 2000
    – USB connection for MAC and Windows
    – the MPC 2500 includes standard the effects board and digital outputs, both expensive add-ons for the MPC 2000.
    – comes equipped with 16 MB of RAM, expandable to 128 MB (MPC 2000 = 2 MB/32 MB)
    – more effects: the MPC 2500 has more effects choices plus two effects processors that can be used simultaneously for more sound variation.
    – 10 outputs included, upgraded to balanced.
    – more storage capabilities: included Compact Flash Drive and internal hard drive compatibility (hard drive not included).
    – optional, user-installable CD-RW/DVD drive
    – advanced functions taken from the MPC 5000: Grid Sequence, Patch Phrase, and Auto Slice.
    – 2 MIDI input and upgraded 4 MIDI output
    – foot switch connections

    key features

    – 16 bit / 44.1kHz sampling
    – 16 velocity and pressure sensitive pads / 4 pad banks
    – 64 tracks per sequence
    – built-in Compact Flash Drive
    – memory: 16MB standard, expandable to 128MB
    – filter type Low pass, Band pass, High pass
    – 2 stereo effects and Master effect: Chorus, Flanger, Bit grunger, 4 Compressor, Phase shifter, Tremolo, Flying Pan, Reverb, Delay
    – 64 MIDI output channels (16 channels x 4 outputs)
    – 2) 1/4″ balancend inputs / (10) 1/4″ balanced outputs
    – 2 MIDI inputs / 4 MIDI outputs
    – digital SPDIF inputs/outputs

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